Essay Writing Helping Words Chart

Anchor charts are a great way to make thinking visible as you record strategies, processes, cues, guidelines and other content during the learning process. Here are 25 of our favorite anchor charts for teaching writing.

1. Why Writers Write

First and second graders will draw inspiration from this fun-filled anchor chart about why we write. Make this chart applicable to older students by expanding on each aspect with a specific audience or goal. “To share experiences” can become “to share experiences with friends, in a postcard or with readers in a memoir.”

Source: The First Grade Parade

 

2. Personal Narrative

Personal narrative is a style that all students will practice in elementary school. This website has some great worksheets to use with your students to prepare them to write their personal narrative. Then all your students can reference this anchor chart to keep them on task.

Source: Rachel’s Reflections

 

3. Understanding Character

Before you can writer about character, you first have to understand it. This anchor chart will help your young writers understand the difference between inside and outside characteristics.

Source: Teacher Trap 

 

4. Diving Deeper into Character

Now that your students understand inside vs. outside characteristics, dive deeper into describing a specific character. This anchor chart is a wonderful idea because students can write their idea on a sticky and then add it.

Source: MPM Ideas 

 

5. Six Traits of Writing

This anchor chart is jam-packed with things for fourth- and fifth-grade writers to remember about the six traits of writing. Use the chart as a whole-class reference, or laminate it to use with a small group. When it’s laminated, students can check off each aspect they’ve included in their own writing. Meaningful dialogue? Check! Problem and solution? Check!

Source: Working for the Classroom 

 

6. Writing Realistic Fiction

This anchor chart reminds upper elementary students how to create realistic stories. It really walks your students through so they have all the elements they need to create their own story.

Source: Two Writing Teachers

 

7. Sequence of Events

Help early-elementary students stay organized with an anchor chart that’s focused on order-of-events language. Tactile learners can write their first drafts on sentence strips and use this format to put the events in order before they transcribe their work onto writing paper.

Source: Life in First Grade

 

8. Informational Writing

Focus upper elementary students on the most important aspects of informational writing while keeping them organized. This chart could be used to support paragraph writing or essays.

Source: Teaching with a Mountain View

 

9. OREO Opinions

This deliciously inspired opinion anchor chart can be used by students in grades 3–5 during writers workshop, or when developing an opinion for discussion or debate. To build out student writing, have them “double-stuff” their Oreos with extra “E” examples.

 

10. Student Reporters

This anchor chart, best for K–2, is made relevant with examples of student work, in this case a fantastic ladybug report. Keep this chart relevant by updating the examples with student work throughout the year. In kindergarten, this will also showcase how students move from prewriting and pictures to writing words and sentences.

Source: Joyful Learning in KC 

 

11. Write from the Heart

Sometimes the hardest part about writing is coming up with who and what you should write about. This is the fun part, though! Use this anchor chart to remind your students that they have lots of good writing options.

Source: First Grade Parade 

 

12. Get Argumentative

Use this anchor chart with middle schoolers to make sure they’re considering all sides of an argument, not just the one that matters the most to them. One way to adapt this chart as students develop their understanding of argument is to write each element—claim, argument, evidence—under a flap that students can lift if they need a reminder.

Source: Literacy & Math Ideas

 

13. Writing Process

This is an anchor charts you’ll likely directly your students to again and again. The writing process has several steps, and it’s good to remind students of this so they don’t get frustrated.

Source: Mrs. Skowronski 

 

14. Writing Checklist

For those young writers in your class, these covers the basics in an easy way.

Source: Kindergarten Chaos 

 

15. Cause and Effect

Cause and Effect will always be an essential part of any story. Help your students come up with different scenarios for cause and effect. In many instances you could have multiples effects, so challenge your students to identify three to four at a time. This will really give them something to write about!

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Source: Mrs. Sandburg

 

16. Organized Paragraph

The stoplight visual can be used to help early elementary students understand and write clear paragraphs. As students are editing their work, have them read with green, yellow and red pencils in hand so they can see how their paragraphs are hooking and engaging readers.

SOURCE: Mandy’s Tips for Teachers 

 

17. A Strong Lead

This sixth-grade anchor chart gives students lots of ways to start their writing. It could be updated midyear with strong examples of leads that students have written or that they’ve found in books. Students could also copy this chart into their notebooks and keep track of the different ways they’ve started their own writing, to see if they develop a signature lead.

Source: Miss Klohn’s Classroom

 

18. Power Up Student Sentences

Inspire students to get crafty and creative with their sentences. Update the moods or keywords with every writing assignment so students are constantly refining their clauses, verbs, and descriptions.

Source: Teaching My Friends 

 

19. Show, Don’t Tell

“Show, don’t tell” is a cardinal rule of writing. This anchor chart, best for upper elementary writers, can be used to strengthen scenes in fiction and narrat

ive nonfiction works. Build this chart out for middle school writers with additional ideas and more complex emotions.

Source: Upper Elementary Snapshots 

 

20. Narrative Organizer

Leave this chart up in your classroom for your students to reference often when they’re writing. It really takes them through creating a successful story.

Source: Working 4 the Classroom 

 

21. Expository Writing

This anchor chart really brings together the elements of a story in a creative, color-coded way.

Source: Adventures of a Future Teacher

 

22. Strong Sentences

Get early-elementary students to write longer, more descriptive sentences with this chart. Bonus: Use sentence strips to switch out the examples of strong sentences based on student writing.

Source: The Good Life

 

23. The Internal Story

This second-grade chart gives students the language to add their own thoughts into their writing. Modify this chart by highlighting key phrases for students with special needs. Or have students create different thought-bubble icons to represent each internal-dialogue sentence starter.

Source: Totally Terrific in Texas 

 

 

24. Evidence Supported

Upper elementary students will benefit from reminders on how to refer to and cite text evidence. Use this anchor chart during writing and discussion to help connect the language that we use across domains.

Source: History Tech 

 

25. CUPS and ARMS

Pick your acronym when revising and editing. These charts are great for third, fourth and fifth graders. Older students can get more targeted with editing marks.

 

26. Spicy Edits

Have students choose one element or “spice” to add to their work as they revise. This chart works for students in elementary and middle school, depending on which elements they include.

Source: Ms. Liu 

 

27. Writing Buddies

Sometimes students can get stuck when working with writing buddies. This anchor chart will help, encouraging students to be positive and make good, thoughtful suggestions.

 

28. Publishing Guidelines

Third and fourth graders can easily see if they’re finished writing with this publishing checklist. Consider making an anchor chart that shows how students can determine if their digital writing is ready to publish (or print) as well.

Source: Juice Boxes and Crayolas 

 

Posting anchor charts keeps current learning accessible and helps your students to make connections as their understanding grows. Keep the charts up-to-date and they’ll serve as a living reference in your classroom and will inspire a culture of writing.

Ah, the IELTS Writing Task 1.Describe the key information in a graph.I’ve read thousands of IELTS graph essays.I will be honest.For the most part, I find them dreadfully boring to review. The main reason for this is that the ESL student doesn’t vary their language or use a variety of synonyms.As 25% of your marks are for the range of vocabulary that you use, this is a very important component to review as you prepare for the Writing Task 1. Here, I am going to provide you with a range of words and phrases to incorporate into your writing now, so that you can get top marks on at least the lexical resource category.

Introduction Phrases

Often ESL students start their essay with ‘The graph shows…’. While this is fine, the verb ‘shows’ could be replaced by a more exciting and high-level vocabulary word.Here are four different prompts to start your essay:

  • The graph illustrates the trends in…
  • The graph reveals information about the changes in…
  • The graph provides the differences between…
  • The graph presents how X has changed over a period of…

Tip:DO NOT write the word below or above in your introduction. i.e. The graph above/below shows…

Add Suitable Adverbs

Adverbs help express a relation of place, time, circumstance, manner, cause, and degree, and can greatly add some color and interest to your writing as well as show off your range of vocabulary.Some great ones to use in the IELTS writing include:

  • approximately
  • dramatically
  • erratically
  • gradually
  • markedly
  • significantly
  • slightly
  • slowly
  • steadily

Use Appropriate Synonyms

Again using a variety of nouns and verbs for words like rise and fall will help increase your overall score.Here are some suggestions:

Add Time Phrases

Where appropriate, add time phrases such as:

  • between… and…
  • from… to… (inclusive)
  • in the year (1994)
  • during/over the period….
  • over the latter half of the year/century/decade/period…..
  • over the next/past/previous….
  • days/weeks/months/years/decades….
  • by (1997)…..

Model Essay Example

Look at the sample Task 1 graphs on the British Council website.Below is my model answer with useful words in bold:

The bar charts illustrate the trends in computer ownership, with a further classification by level of education, from 2002 to 2010.

Over the period, it can be observed that there was a significant surge in the percentage of the population that owned a computer. In the year 2002, only about 58% of the population owned a computer, whereas by 2010, this gradually increased to where over three-quarters of individuals had a home computer.

Looking at the information by level of education reveals that higher levels of education correspond to higher levels of computer ownership in both of those years. In 2002, a significantly low percentage of the population who did not finish high school had a computer, but this figure skyrocketed by 2010, going from 15% to over 40%. There were also dramatic climbs, of approximately 30 percentage points, for those with a high school diploma or an unfinished college education (reaching 65% and 85%, respectively, in 2010).

To conclude, during the last decade, therehas been a substantial growth in computer ownership across all educational levels.

Hopefully you’ll start to incorporate some of these key words and phrases in your IELTS Task 1 Writing. If you still don’t feel comfortable doing so, consider dedicating more time to your IELTS studies with Magoosh’s fun, engaging IELTS prep for extra practice.

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