A Forward Glance New Essays On Edith Wharton

Professor, EnglishWomen's & Gender Studies mhoney1@unl.edu

Honey's specialization and interests include American Women’s Literature of the Twentieth Century, Harlem Renaissance, Women in World War II, and Popular Culture. She recently published "Bitter Fruit": African American Women in World War II (University of Missouri Press 1999); Double-Take: Cross-Currents of Gender and Genre in the Harlem Renaissance (Rutgers University Press 2001) co-edited with Venetria Patton, ”Winnifred Eaton (Onoto Watanna)” in eds. Sharon Harris, Jennifer Putzi, and Heidi Jacobs; "American Women Prose Writers, 1870-1920 "(Dictionary of Literary Biography, Gale Research Publishers 2000);” Erotic Visual Tropes in the Fiction of Edith Wharton” in eds. Candace Waid, Clare Colquitt, and Susan Goodman, A Forward Glance: New Essays on Edith Wharton (University of Delaware Press 1999). Honey had CNN interview on Rosie the Riveter, “Voices of the Millennium”, April 1999; consultant for NBC documentary “The Greatest Generation” hosted by Tom Brokaw, January 1999; consultant to the University of Kansas Spencer Museum of Art on the pin-up art of Alberto Vargas during World War II. She teaches Images of Women in Popular Culture, Twentieth Century Women Writers, Graduate Seminars in Edith Wharton, Early 20th Century American Women Writers, Women Writers and Art 1890-1930.

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